Immigrant Day 2006 

Leg visit notes

Team 3 (Sehwan) tRanscript

[edit]Miranda

Hazel Miranda: And let me just say that the senator’s district… she represents south corridor of Beverly that is Sen Cedillo’s bill

Sungpyo Ma: Oh ok, so you guys support SB 5067?

HM: Well I can’t speak for her, but I can only say that she has been in the past a strong supporter of these efforts

SP: Ok. 지금

[edit]Trout

Alana G. Troutt: 67..

Lee Chul Kyu: I mean.. [what about] Marvyn? (points finger up)

AT: Oh what does he [stand for]…? Like I said, he is immigrant by himself. (uhuh) So he is always a big supporter of all immigrant issues

LCK: Oh so he’s on our side.

AT: Yes, he’s on your side. Yes. (laugh)

SP: We’ve just had a meeting with the Senator… (Marta) Escutia. And we talked to them abut SB 1267. (uhuh) And they told me that they in the senate side in the appropriate committee, they just passed it, (uhuh) and they are waiting for someone to introduce it in the Assembly side. (yeah) So if he can support this bill…

AT: Oh, that’s fine, yes. What they need now is for an assembly member to carry it.. read the bill on the floor .. (yes) we call him a jockey (SP laughs)

SP: SB 160.. (160?) 160, yes. This is gonna be the billl that’ll support the undocumented.. (undocumented students, uhuh) who can’t go, who can’t apply to financial aid and enroll. Right now there is already the AB 540, which will give them in-state tuition, but then… even though they can pay in-state tuition they have to pay everything, they cannot (enroll) yeah enroll, financial aid, scholarships, so this bill has a lot of undocumented immigrants can (apply for.. financial aid) yeah, so if they can support this bill also.

AT: yeah we’re an “immigrant-friendly office” (great!) [laugh) (alright)

[edit]Legislative Visits

  • Mark Ridley-Thomas, Assemblyperson
    • Room 3152
    • w/Chief of Staff Vincent Harris
    • Los Angeles County
    • 10:30 AM
    • Phone: 319-2048
  • Denise Moreno DUCHENY
    • 11:30 AM
    • w/Kasey Schimke or other budget person
    • San Diego County
    • Room 4081
    • Phone: 651-4040

[edit]SB 1267 (Cedillo), 2006

[1]

[edit]Bill Summary

CURRENT BILL STATUS

  • MEASURE : S.B. No. 1267
  • AUTHOR(S) : Cedillo.
  • TOPIC : Office of Immigrant Affairs.
  • HOUSE LOCATION : SEN
  • +LAST AMENDED DATE  : 03/13/2006
  • TYPE OF BILL :
    • Active
    • Non-Urgency
    • Non-Appropriations
    • Majority Vote Required
    • Non-State-Mandated Local Program
    • Fiscal
    • Non-Tax Levy
  • LAST HIST. ACT. DATE: 04/24/2006
  • LAST HIST. ACTION  : Placed on APPR. suspense file.
  • COMM. LOCATION : SEN APPROPRIATIONS
  • TITLE : An act to add Section 12087.5 to the Government Code, relating to naturalization services.

[edit]History

  • Apr. 24 Placed on APPR. suspense file.
  • Apr. 17 From committee: Do pass, but first be re-referred to Com. on APPR. (Ayes 3. Noes 2. Page 3517.) Re-referred to Com. on APPR.
  • Apr. 12 Set for hearing April 24.
  • Mar. 20 Set for hearing April 5.
  • Mar. 13 From committee with author’s amendments. Read second time. Amended. Re-referred to committee.
  • Feb. 16 To Com. on G.M., E. & A.
  • Feb. 10 From print. May be acted upon on or after March 12.
  • Feb. 9 Introduced. Read first time. To Com. on RLS. for assignment. To print.

[edit]Bill Text (2/9/06)

BILL NUMBER: SB 1267 INTRODUCED

BILL TEXT
INTRODUCED BY Senator Cedillo

FEBRUARY 9, 2006

An act to add Section 12087.5 to the Government Code, relating to naturalization services.
LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL’S DIGEST

SB 1267, as introduced, Cedillo Office of Immigrant Affairs.

Existing law sets forth the duties of the Department of Community Services and Development respecting certain community programs in the state. Existing law appropriates $1,500,000 to the department for purposes of the Naturalization Services Program.

This bill would establish within the department the Office of Immigrant Affairs in order to ensure the integration and civic participation of new citizens in the state. The office would be overseen and managed by a director who would administer the Naturalization Services Program and develop a program plan to add components to that program, work with local organizations to ensure the success and availability of services provided through the Naturalization Services Program, and establish an advisory committee to serve as a liaison between the Office of Immigrant Affairs and the immigrant communities of the state.

  • Vote: majority.
  • Appropriation: no.
  • Fiscal committee: yes.
  • State-mandated local program: no.

THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS:

  1. SECTION 1.
    1. The Legislature finds and declares as follows:
      1. Immigrants are a vibrant force in California’s changing demographics. More than one-quarter of California residents are foreign born. Of the 8.8 million foreign born, 39 percent are United States citizens and 3.3 million are legal permanent residents.
      2. Most noncitizens have family members who are citizens. Ninety percent of Latinos and 80 percent of Asians live in households with citizens.
      3. Approximately 40 percent of Californians speak a language other than English at home.
      4. Fifty-five percent of California’s immigrants come from Latin America, while 33 percent come from Asia, 8 percent from Europe, 2 percent from North America, and the rest from Africa and Oceania.
      5. Immigrants fuel California’s economy through their labor and entrepreneurship. Immigrants comprise one-third of California’s labor force in key economic sectors: 40 percent in general services, 45 percent in manufacturing, and 33 percent work in a variety of sectors. Sixty-six percent of gardeners are immigrants. Sixty-six percent of cooks are immigrants. Sixty-six percent of domestic workers are immigrants. Ninety percent of farm workers are immigrants.
      6. Immigrants are among California’s most productive entrepreneurs and have created jobs for tens of thousands of Californians. In San Jose alone, immigrant owners of technology companies created more than 58,000 jobs and generated more than $17 billion in sales during the 1990s.
      7. Immigrants will represent a significant proportion of California’s voters in years to come. In California, there are currently 2.7 million immigrants eligible to naturalize and several million more that will soon become eligible to naturalize. This will increase the number of voters who are naturalized citizens in the years to come.
      8. California has at least 85 cities where noncitizen adults comprise more than 25 percent of the city’s total voting-age population. There are 30 municipalities where noncitizen adults make up more than 40 percent of the voting-age population.
      9. Immigrants often require the most assistance immediately upon arrival to the United States. However, as immigrants reside in the state for a longer period of time, they are less likely to use services and more likely to contribute to the state’s culture and economy.
      10. It is in the best interest of the state and its residents to establish an Office of Immigrant Affairs for state government to advocate and promote cooperation and understanding between government agencies and immigrant residents, and to assist immigrants toward naturalization.
      11. Citizenship and civic participation among all California residents is vital to the economic and societal well-being of the state.
      12. It is the state’s responsibility to help its immigrant population integrate in society, develop a sense of belonging, and seize opportunities for success in order to ensure equal opportunity for a high quality of life of every resident.
      13. California’s primary goal should be to support the ability of all residents, including immigrants to be economically self-sufficient, participate in our nation’s and state political process, and foster a sense of responsibility to our community.
      14. It is the intent of the Legislature that the Office of Immigrant Affairs ensure state government agencies and California communities are aware of the needs of immigrants and that immigrants receive appropriate assistance to quickly achieve and maintain self-reliance and full integration into our society.
  2. SEC. 2. Section 12087.5 is added to the Government Code, to read: 12087.5.
    1. There is hereby established the Office of Immigrant Affairs within the Department of Community Service and Development. In order to ensure the integration and civic participation of new citizens in the state, the office shall do all of the following:
      1. Address the needs of immigrant communities by setting objectives and deliverables, and partnering with state government agencies to provide outreach and services to the ethnic communities.
      2. Work with state agencies and departments to identify resources and programs that can be used by immigrant residents to assist their assimilation, including, but not limited to, education, adult education, language skills, civics, job training, consumer protection, housing, domestic violence, health, and naturalization services.
      3. Conduct data-driven policy analysis on issues impacting immigrant communities.
      4. Develop strategies, program proposals, and goals that support the ability of new citizens to be economically self-sufficient, participate in governance, and foster a sense of belonging and responsibility to the community.
      5. Provide services and information to help new citizens learn English, be informed of our laws and support public safety, know their rights, be responsible family members, engage in civic affairs, and maximize their contributions to ensure a high quality of life in our community.
      6. Work with educational institutions, community-based organizations, nonprofits, and private programs to develop a civics curriculum for people participating in the Naturalization Services Program.
      7. Serve as a clearinghouse to help new citizens and eligible immigrants for the naturalization process access translated information on resources available in the state. Also, distribute information on adult education, English literacy, civic education, and citizenship services offered by local organizations.
    2. The office shall be overseen and managed by a director to be appointed by the department.
    3. The director of the office shall do all of the following:
      1. Administer the Naturalization Services Program and develop a program plan to add components to that program to allow it to cater to the needs of California’s immigrant population more efficiently and effectively in the areas of naturalization and civic participation.
      2. Work with local organizations to ensure the success and availability of services provided through the Naturalization Services Program.
      3. Establish an advisory committee to serve as a liaison between the Office of Immigrant Affairs and the immigrant communities of the state.
    4. The advisory committee shall do all of the following:
      1. Along with the Director of the Office of Immigrant Affairs, gather information about the needs of California’s immigrant population, determine key state governmental resources used by immigrant communities, identify key policy areas and areas of concern and report findings with recommendations to the state as to how it can respond to the issues impacting California’s immigrant population.
      2. Help the office create a strategy to promote public awareness of the contributions of immigrants and how immigration can support community goals.
      3. Identify ways to define and measure immigrant integration and self-reliance and report progress to policymakers and the public. The advisory committee shall work to identify ways to improve the naturalization process and immigration services.

[edit]Bill Analysis (4/7/06)

Hearing Date:April 5, 2006 |Bill No:SB | | |1267 |

SENATE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT MODERNIZATION, EFFICIENCY, AND ACCOUNTABILITY Senator Liz Figueroa, Chair

Bill No: SB 1267 Author: Cedillo As Amended: March 13, 2006 Fiscal:Yes

SUBJECT: Office of Immigrant Affairs

SUMMARY: Establishes the Office of Immigrant Affairs within the Department of Community Services and Development, and charges the Office with various duties related to the integration and civic participation of immigrant communities.

[edit]Existing law:

  1. Requires secondary adult education and community college programs to provide citizenship education services and describes outreach programs and services for eligible immigrants.
  2. Establishes the Department of Community Services and Development, and charges this Department with providing technical assistance to community action agencies, Indian tribes, and other agencies that operate programs of an anti-poverty nature.

[edit]This bill:

  1. Establishes the Office of Immigrant Affairs (Office) within the Department of Community Service and Development (DCSD).
  2. Requires the Office, in order to ensure the integration and civic participation of new citizens in the state, to do all of the following:
    1. Address the needs of immigrant communities by setting objectives and deliverables, and partnering with state government agencies to provide outreach and services to the ethnic communities;
    2. Work with state agencies and departments to identify resources and programs that can be used by immigrant residents to assist their integration, including, but not limited to, education, adult education, language skills, civics, job training, consumer protection, housing, domestic violence, health, and naturalization services;
    3. Conduct data-driven policy analysis on issues impacting immigrant communities;
    4. Develop strategies, program proposals, and goals that support the ability of new citizens to be economically self-sufficient, participate in governance, and foster a sense of belonging and responsibility to the community;
    5. Provide services and information to help new citizens learn English, be informed of our laws and support public safety, know their rights, be responsible family members, engage in civic affairs, and maximize their contributions to ensure a high quality of life in our community;
    6. Work with educational institutions, community-based organizations, nonprofits, and private programs to develop a civics curriculum for people participating in the Naturalization Services Program; and,
    7. Serve as a clearinghouse to help new citizens and eligible immigrants for the naturalization process access translated information on resources available in the state, and to also distribute information on adult education, English literacy, civic education, and citizenship services offered by local organizations.
  3. Requires the Office to be overseen and managed by a director to be appointed by DCSD.
  4. Requires the director of the Office to do all of the following:
    1. Administer the Naturalization Services Program and develop a program plan to add components to that program to allow it to cater to the needs of California’s immigrant population more efficiently and effectively in the areas of naturalization and civic participation;
    2. Work with local organizations to ensure the success and availability of services provided through the Naturalization Services Program; and,
    3. Establish an advisory committee to serve as a liaison between the Office and immigrant communities of the state. Requires the advisory committee to identify key areas of concern and report findings with recommendations to the state as to how it can respond to the issues, help the Office create a strategy to promote public awareness of the contributions of immigrants, and identify ways to measure immigrant integrations and self-reliance and report progress to policymakers.
  5. Makes the following uncodified legislative findings and declarations:
    1. Immigrants are a vibrant force in California’s changing demographics. More than one-quarter of California residents are foreign born. Of the 8.8 million foreign born, 39 percent are United States citizens and 3.3 million are legal permanent residents;
    2. Most noncitizens have family members who are citizens. Ninety percent of Latinos and 80 percent of Asians live in households with citizens;
    3. Approximately 40 percent of Californians speak a language other than English at home;
    4. Fifty-five percent of California’s immigrants come from Latin America, while 33 percent come from Asia, 8 percent from Europe, 2 percent from North America, and the rest from Africa and Oceania;
    5. Immigrants fuel California’s economy through their labor and entrepreneurship. Immigrants comprise one-third of California’s labor force in key economic sectors: 40 percent in general services, 45 percent in manufacturing, and 33 percent work in a variety of sectors. Sixty-six percent of gardeners are immigrants. Sixty-six percent of cooks are immigrants. Sixty-six percent of domestic workers are immigrants. Ninety percent of farm workers are immigrants;
    6. Immigrants are among California’s most productive entrepreneurs and have created jobs for tens of thousands of Californians. In San Jose alone, immigrant owners of technology companies created more than 58,000 jobs and generated more than $17 billion in sales during the 1990s;
    7. Immigrants will represent a significant proportion of California’s voters in years to come. In California, there are currently 2.7 million immigrants eligible to naturalize and several million more that will soon become eligible to naturalize. This will increase the number of voters who are naturalized citizens in the years to come;
    8. California has at least 85 cities where noncitizen adults comprise more than 25 percent of the city’s total voting-age population. There are 30 municipalities where noncitizen adults make up more than 40 percent of the voting-age population;
    9. Immigrants often require the most assistance immediately upon arrival to the United States. However, as immigrants reside in the state for a longer period of time, they are less likely to use services and more likely to contribute to the state’s culture and economy;
    10. It is in the best interest of the state and its residents to establish an Office of Immigrant Affairs for state government to advocate and promote cooperation and understanding between government agencies and immigrant residents, and to assist immigrants toward naturalization;
      1. Citizenship and civic participation among all California residents is vital to the economic and societal well-being of the state;
      2. It is the state’s responsibility to help its immigrant population integrate in society, develop a sense of belonging, and seize opportunities for success in order to ensure equal opportunity for a high quality of life of every resident; and,
      3. California’s primary goal should be to support the ability of all residents, including immigrants to be economically self-sufficient, participate in our nation’s and state political process, and foster a sense of responsibility to our community.
  6. States the intent of the Legislature that the Office ensure state government agencies and California communities are aware of the needs of immigrants and that immigrants receive appropriate assistance to quickly achieve and maintain self-reliance and full integration into our society.

FISCAL EFFECT: Unknown

[edit]COMMENTS:

[edit]Purpose

According to the author, this bill is sponsored by the California Immigrant Welfare Collaborative, and is based on the Office of Ethnic Affairs in the State of Utah.

The author states that in California, there are currently 2.7 million immigrants eligible to naturalize and several million more that will soon become eligible to naturalize. This will increase the number of voters who are naturalized citizens in the years to come. The author points out that California has at least 85 cities where non-citizen adults comprise more than 25% of the city’s total voting-age population, including 30 municipalities where non-citizen adults make up more than 40% of the voting-age population. The author asserts that Citizenship and civic participation among all California residents is vital to the economic and societal well being of the state.

The author argues that given these statistics, California’s governance structure lacks an office responsible for helping California’s immigrant population integrate in society, develop a sense of belonging, and seize opportunities for success in order to ensure equal opportunity for a high quality of life for every resident.

According to the author, it is in the best interest of the State of California and its citizens to establish an Office of Immigrant Affairs for state government to advocate and promote cooperation and understanding between government agencies and immigrant citizens, and to assist immigrants toward naturalization.

[edit]Naturalization Services Program

Although it has never been codified in statute, for more than 8 years, DCSD has operated a Naturalization Services Program that has been funded by the state budget. According to DCSD, “the Naturalization Services Program is a State funded program that assists legal permanent residents in obtaining citizenship. Services include outreach, intake and assessment, citizenship application assistance, citizenship testing and interview preparation, and coordination with and referral to other naturalization organizations.

The Naturalization Services Program was funded at $1.5 million in the current fiscal year, and the Governor’s Proposed Budget maintains this level of funding for the 2006-07 fiscal year.

[edit]Arguments in Support

The California Immigrant Welfare Collaborative (CIWC), the sponsor of this bill, states that it is a statewide partnership of four immigrant rights organizations: the Asian Pacific American Legal Center of Southern California, the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights of Los Angeles, the National Immigration Law Center, and the Services, Immigrant Rights and Education Network.

CIWC states in support that as home to the largest immigrant population in the country, it is critical for California to show leadership in implementing model policies for integrating newcomers into our state. CIWC argues that access to citizenship services, support programs, and civic participation opportunities are key components of successfully integrating immigrant families into our state’s social, political, and civic fabric.

Asian Americans for Civil Rights and Equality (AACRE) states in support that Asian Pacific Americans represent 14 percent of California’s population, and that among adults age 18 and older, 78 percent of Asians are foreign-born, and a majority of these individuals are naturalized citizens. AACRE supports this bill in order to provide key components to successfully integrate families into our state’s social, political and civic fabric.

The Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund (MALDEF) states in support that although immigrants are eager to fully participate in all aspects of American life, many lack the appropriate tools or information to do so. MALDEF states that this bill would address the needs of immigrant communities and provide culturally appropriate outreach and services that assist and support new immigrants towards naturalization.

The California Partnership supports this bill, stating that California’s changing demographics point to the necessity for an Office of Immigrant Affairs that builds upon the strengths of immigrants and their families and expedites their journey towards self-sufficiency.

The California Landscape Contractors Association also supports this bill, stating that if Congress enacts a comprehensive immigration reform bill, it is essential that state governments step up to assist with the naturalization of undocumented workers who qualify, and that this bill is a good beginning.

[edit]Related Legislation

AB 2060 (De La Torre), pending in the Assembly, proposes to codify the Naturalization Services Program, and would also require regional collaboration among the grantees that receive the money, add a civic participation and leadership component to the program and create an advisory board.

[edit]SUPPORT AND OPPOSITION:

Support:

California Immigrant Welfare Collaborative (sponsor) American Muslim Voice Asian Americans for Civil Rights and Equality Asian American Legal Center of Southern California Asian Law Alliance California Church Impact California Landscape Contractors Association California Partnership Catholic Charities of Los Angeles Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area Community Resource Project, Inc. Diocese of San Jose Filipino American Service Group, Inc. General Teamsters, Warehousemen and Helpers Union, Local No. 890 L.A. Union Law Center for Families Mayfair Improvement Initiative Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund TODEC Legal Center UNITE HERE Local 11 Worksite Wellness Los Angeles

Opposition:

None on file

Consultant:Vincent D. Marchand

[edit]4/5/06 Vote

MOTION: Do pass, but re-refer to the Committee on Appropriations. (AYES 3. NOES 2.) (PASS)

  • AYES:
    • Figueroa
    • Ducheny
    • Kuehl
  • NOES
    • Ackerman
    • Ashburn

[edit]Appropriations Committee Fiscal Summary (4/26/06)

Senate Appropriations Committee Fiscal Summary

Senator Kevin Murray, Chairman
1267 (Cedillo)
  • Hearing Date: 4/24/2006
  • Amended: 3/13/2006
  • Consultant: John Miller
  • Policy Vote: Gov. Accountability
  • 3 – 2

BILL SUMMARY: Establishes the Office of Immigrant Affairs within the Department of Community Services and Development and charges the Office with duties related to the integration and civic participation of immigrant communities.

Fiscal Impact (in thousands)

Major Provisions 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 Fund
Program support $ 1,700 $ 3,500 $ 3,500 GF

STAFF COMMENTS: This bill meets the criteria for referral to Suspense.

This measure creates the Office of Immigrant Affairs (Office) within the Department of Community Services and Development to insure the integration and civic participation of new citizens in the state. The new Office would provide outreach and services to ethnic communities; work with state agencies to identify resources to assist immigrant residents access education, language skills, job training, health and naturalization services. The Office would serve as a clearing house for information to help new citizens and eligible immigrants become independent and participate in civic affairs and would assist in the operation of the existing Naturalization Services Program.

California currently provides $1.5 million for support of the Naturalization Services Program which assists legal immigrants become citizens through services like those proposed in this bill. A similar measure, AB 2060 (De La Torre), has been determined to cost approximately $3.5 million. Administrative costs are expected to total $500,000. There are currently 2.5 million immigrants in California eligible for naturalization.

[edit]4/24/06 Vote

MOTION: Placed on Appropriations Suspense file. (AYES 11. NOES 0.) (PASS)

  • AYES
    • Murray
    • Alarcon
    • Alquist
    • Ashburn
    • Battin
    • Dutton
    • Escutia
    • Florez
    • Ortiz
    • Romero
    • Torlakson
  • NOES
  • ABSENT, ABSTAINING, OR NOT VOTING
    • Aanestad
    • Poochigian